Romney’s Campaign Furiously to Restore the Lead He once Held

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TAMPA , Fla. – The outcome to the south, in the largest swing state, now seems very much in doubt, even as the lion’s share of attention in the presidential campaign goes to the battleground of Ohio and the storm-battered states of the Mid-Atlantic.

After the first debate, Mitt Romney moved into a lead here, and since then with its 29 electoral votes sat solidly in their column as insisted by their aides. However, President Obama’s fortunes improving here with several polls results and as of Thursday morning, Democrats perform well in the early voting by leading about 59,000 out of more than 3 million absentee and in person early votes. It is a must that precious hours should be devoted by Romney to defend his position in the state.
Romney campaigned in Florida after Saturday, must returned on Wednesday for rallies in Tampa, Miami and Jacksonville due to the polls now showing in dead heat as such expecting to back over the weekend, when Obama also is scheduled to campaign here.
While victory for Obama  is a prize but of Romney it is a necessity. The win of Romney in Ohio and other Midwestern states can become a moot without a win in this state.
In these closing days of the campaign, the presidential race has tightened and the battle helps illustrate how the major swing states test Obama’s ability to hold a different part of the coalition that elected him four years ago.
To the white, working class voters in Ohio , the outcome turns on which man can they most appeal. With his bail out of the auto Industry and warnings about Romney’s background in the private equity business, Obama has wooed them with constant reminders. It will be tested how much loyalty the president still has among college-educated suburbanites, particularly women in the state of Virginia and Colorado .
They both fight for the final sliver of undecided single women on the airwaves, with dueling ads on abortion and contraception about Romney’s policies.

Ann Romney Shows Mitt's Fond Heart

Ann and Mitt Romney. image:http://www.telegraph.co.uk

Ann Romney battled depression and the onset of multiple sclerosis, revealing the tender side to the man who will formally accept the Republican presidential nomination on Tuesday. And she recalled how her husband would “curl up in bed with me.”

The Republican National Convention in Tampa , Florida reveal the account of the Romney family’s battle with Mrs. Romney disease which was diagnose in 1998 as she deliver a keynote speech.
During the interviews for CNN at the Romney’s large lakeside home in Wolfeboro , New Hampshire , Mrs. Romney said “Even when I was as sick as that he would curl up in the bed with me,” she paused to wipe away a tear on the interview.
“So, you just knew that was where he was. It was like he was gonna do anything he could just to say I’m here. You’re OK. Just stay right there, and will be OK.”
Tagg Romney, 42 year old eldest son, recalled the human side of the former founder of Bain Capital private equity with a voice similarly breaking with emotion.
“It was a tough moment for both of them. It was interesting to see the way he treated her as they went through that,” Tagg said, “Very caring, very loving, very frustrating for him not to be able to step in and fix it. But they drew even closer.”
Mrs. Romney hopes that she can convey to a prime time US television audience on Tuesday night, that her husband is not the awkward, out of touch Bostonian Banker that he is sometimes characterized as being.
Mrs. Romney in a sincere and moving interview recalled the heart stopping moment in 1968 when she feared here future husband and high school sweetheart may have died in a car crash in France .
“George (Father of Romney) called mo on the phone and said we have some bad news about Mitt, but he didn’t tell me what, and then he came and picked me up and took me to his home, I had word that he was killed,” she said, moved at the memory.
“We waited for hours and hours- most of the night – to get word from France that he was actually alive.”

Month of August May Get a Boost for Romney

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The choice of Wisconsin Rep. Paul Ryan as Romney’s running mate and the upcoming Republican National Convention in Tampa, Fla , may get a boost for Romney.

These can be a welcome to the campaign that saw slippage by several percentage points in polls to President Barack Obama before Saturday’s Ryan announcement.

It is normal that in presidential race positive bumps are common. But it’s just common for them to fade, at times suddenly.

The selection of Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin got a nice spike from Sen. John McCain selection followed immediately by an upbeat 2008 Republican convention in St. Paul , Minn. This GOP nominee allowed drawing even in some polls heading into the fall campaign season even with Obama.

Palin’s qualifications quickly arose controversy. The McCain’s erratic response to September’s financial meltdown suffered too much the ticket including his off-key claim that “all the fundamentals are fine.”

The Ryan’s selection shows an initial division as what some polls show. Despite his prominent role in Washington as the architect of conservative GOP budgets but they also suggest voters don’t know much about him.

The two sides’ are now scrambling to define him for voters. According to the Democrats the budgets reward the wealthy with tax breaks at the expense of the middle class. While the newly energized Republicans consider him as a spirited champion of conservative values that would help rein in federal spending.

Andy Kohut, president of the Pew Research Center said “If there is a bump. It’s likely to be short-lived.” This is noting that the Democratic convention closely follows GOP one.

The four candidates campaigned Tuesday intensively in those states considered as their battle ground.

Romney in Ohio is in deep campaigned while Obama prolong his bus trip across Iowa. The two for Vice President is also on each direction for Ryan to Colorado and Vice president Joe Biden in rural southern Virginia.